Why You Should Spay or Neuter Your Dog

Adopted January 2014

Adopted January 2014

Why should I have my pet neutered or spayed?

Animal shelters, both public and private, are faced with a huge dilemma: What to do with the surplus of animals that they cannot find forever homes for? About 3.7 million animals are euthanized at kill shelters each year, due to the sheer fact that there are not enough people willing to adopt. If you have your pet spayed or neutered, it ensures that you will not add to this extreme problem.

What are some of the health and behavioral benefits?

A long-term benefit of spaying and neutering is improved health for your dogs. Spaying females prior to their first heat cycle nearly eliminates the risk of breast cancer and totally prevents uterine infections and uterine cancer. Neutering males prevents testicular cancer and enlargement of the prostate gland, and greatly reduces their risk for perianal tumors.

Spaying a female dog eliminates the messiness associated with the heat cycle.

By neutering a male dog it can prevent certain undesirable sexual behaviors, like urine marking, humping, male aggression and the urge to roam. If you have more than one pet in your household, all the pets will generally get along better if they are neutered.
Talk to your vet about the appropriate age for your dog.  We are strong supporters of spaying and/or neutering your pet since it is both healthy and effectively reduces pet overpopulation.

I don’t even own a pet! Why is this my problem?

“All of us are affected by animal overpopulation. Millions of tax dollars are spent annually to shelter and care for stray, abandoned and unwanted pets. Much of that money is spent to euthanize these animals when homes cannot be found. Human health is threatened by the danger of transmittable diseases (including rabies), animal bites and attacks. Property may be damaged and livestock killed when pets roam in search of food. Animal waste is proving to be a serious environment hazard, fouling yards and parks. It is only when all of us assume the responsibility for pet overpopulation that we will see any decrease in the problem.” (American Humane Association)

Shouldn’t every female pet have at least one litter before being spayed?

No. In fact, your pet will be healthier if she never sexually matures.

Doesn’t neutering alter an animal’s personality?

“No. Personality changes that may result from neutering are for the better. Not being distracted by the instinctual need to find a mate helps your pet stop roaming and decreases aggressive tendencies.”(American Humane Association)

Won’t animal shelters take care of the surplus animals?

“No. Shelters do their best to place animals in loving homes, but the number of homeless animals far exceeds the number of willing adopters. This leaves many loving and healthy animals in our community that must be euthanized as the only humane solution to this tragic dilemma. Only spaying and neutering can end the overpopulation problem.” (American Humane Association)

 

Information is from the American Humane Association.